All posts tagged: Roebuck Bay

Northern Spiny-tailed Gecko Broome Bird Observatory Western Australia

Spiny Tailed Gecko

Spring slipped past us rather suddenly. Wildflowers common not even a fortnight ago disappeared without a single trace while¬†Rose-tipped Mulla Mulla¬†(Ptilotus manglesii) have popped up almost everywhere, signalling the start of summer with its dry and hot weather. Although these conditions have restricted my outdoor activities to some extent, recent upgrades of camera gear as well as Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop are the main culprits for my absence in the field. While spending many hours behind a computer screen is not my favourite pastime, I’ve become to realise that my photographic collection is in desperate need of proper organisation; a task postponed too often and which now I’m trying to complete bit by bit. I guess that looking back at memorable moments is the fun bit though, and now and then I even stumble upon some almost forgotten encounters, as this Spiny Tailed Gecko (Strophurus ciliaris) which was seen during a night walk at the Broome Bird Observatory. Well-adapted to hunting in the dark, geckos’ eyes are around 350 times more sensitive to light than …

Rainbow bee-eater Roebuck Bay Broome Western Australia

Life in the mangroves

When descending the red Pindan cliffs towards the beach and benthic flats of Roebuck Bay, one comes across several mangals and tidal creeks. The tropical mangrove forests near Broome consist of several species, such as the common grey mangrove (Avicennia marina), stilt-rooted mangrove (Rhizophora stylosa) and the red mangrove (Ceriops tagal) or lanyi-lanyi. Those forests are complex and rich habitats that require much specialization to live in, and many animals found in the mangroves are therefore absent or rare in other places. With their bright red colour, flame fiddler crabs (Uca flammula) are the most beautiful crabs of the mangroves by far. The typical big and oversized claw of this mostly vegetarian crustacean is waved to defend their territory rather than to crush food, while their remarkable appearance is further enhanced by eyes positioned on tall stalks, enabling them to detect threats from afar so they can disappear in their burrow quickly. The Mangrove mudskipper is another conspicuous creature that can be found in Roebuck’s mangroves. Because they are able to breath through their skin …