All posts tagged: Orchid

Purple Enamel Orchid Elythranthera brunonis Beelu National Park Western Australia

Purple Enamel Orchid

Do they say that the bush is all greyness and gloom Why, the rainbow has lent every thread from its loom To weave into flower and shrub – Lilian Wooster Greaves The wildflowers currently on display in and around the Jarrah forest are nothing short of spectacular. This purple enamel orchid (Caladenia brunosis) found near the Department of Parks and Wildlife headquarters was one of the highlights. I’m sure more will follow soon!

Spider Orchid Lesueur National Park

Spider Orchid – Kambarang

The last couple of weeks the weather has changed significantly with longer dry periods and temperatures rising in the thirties again. This time of the year is called Kambarang in the Nyungar calendar – the season of birth. The warming trend transforms nature around us with animals starting to show more activity while flowers explode in all sort of colours and shapes. In wildflower country a spectacular floral display erupts including Balgas, Banksias, Kangaroo Paws and Orchids. A very good place to witness this spectacle is Lesueur National Park, with over 900 plant species – of which many endemic to this region – one of the world’s biodiversity hotspots along with places like Sundaland in South East Asia, the tropical Andes in South America or the Cape Floristic region in South Africa. Important landmarks in this National Park are the laterite mesas that are called after members of the Hamelin’s Naturaliste expedition in 1801 – Mount Peron, Mount Micheaud and Mount Lesueur. The trails that surround those flat-topped mountains lead through the exceptionally diverse Kwongan heathland, home …

Common Donkey Orchid Lesmurdie Falls NP

Common Donkey Orchid – Djilba

Common Donkey Orchids (Diuris corymbosa) are some of the easiest recognisable Australian orchids due to their large ‘Donkey ear-like’ petals. These orchids flower between August and October, and with the first specimens blooming on the sandy soils of the Darling scarp the first signs of spring have finally arrived. According to the Nyungar calendar this time of the year is called Djilba – the growing season during which a massive explosion of wild flowers in Australia’s South West is happening. In anticipation of this botanic spectacle it would be an understatement to say we are getting a little excited!