All posts tagged: Australian Wildlife

Northern Spiny-tailed Gecko Broome Bird Observatory Western Australia

Spiny Tailed Gecko

Spring slipped past us rather suddenly. Wildflowers common not even a fortnight ago disappeared without a single trace while Rose-tipped Mulla Mulla (Ptilotus manglesii) have popped up almost everywhere, signalling the start of summer with its dry and hot weather. Although these conditions have restricted my outdoor activities to some extent, recent upgrades of camera gear as well as Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop are the main culprits for my absence in the field. While spending many hours behind a computer screen is not my favourite pastime, I’ve become to realise that my photographic collection is in desperate need of proper organisation; a task postponed too often and which now I’m trying to complete bit by bit. I guess that looking back at memorable moments is the fun bit though, and now and then I even stumble upon some almost forgotten encounters, as this Spiny Tailed Gecko (Strophurus ciliaris) which was seen during a night walk at the Broome Bird Observatory. Well-adapted to hunting in the dark, geckos’ eyes are around 350 times more sensitive to light than …

Little Egret Egretta garzetta Herdsman Lake Western Australia

Little Egret

The shallows and flooded grass on the fringes of Herdsman Lake host a variety of wading birds such as Spoonbills, Herons and Egrets. The latter are represented by two different species, with the big yellow-billed Eastern Great Egret (Ardea modesta) as a fairly common resident and the much smaller black-billed Little Egret (Egretta garzetta) as an occasional visitor. With water levels relatively high at the moment – much of the trail near the Swamp Paperbark trail is currently inundated – there is sufficient food for all, and the Little Egrets can be seen hunting little fish and tadpoles at lighting fast speed.

Black Swan Cygnet Herdsman Lake Western Australia

Black Swan Cygnet

Black Swans are a common sight in our wetlands, and in spring both adults cruise the shallows with their offspring. In certain parts of Herdsman Lake they are fairly accustomed to humans, making it easy to observe their grey cygnets preen and do the occasional shakedown in order to keep parasites and bacteria at bay. Mum and dad always keep a watchful eye though, as young swans are sometimes attacked and killed by rivalling family’s cobs.

Tiger Snake Notechis scutatis Herdsman Lake Western Australia

Tiger Snake – Moyup

With the season of Kambarang in full swing reptiles are out and about again, and a walk around Herdsman Lake at this time of the year will be rewarded with an almost guaranteed sighting of a Tiger Snake (Notechis scutatis). These beautiful but highly venomous snakes call this wetland home, where they hunt mainly for frogs, although lizards, small mammals and young birds are also taken. Their live young are born in autumn and early winter, at the same time when the first baby frogs appear. They’re most active during spring and summer, although they prefer to forage at night as they dislike hot weather.

Little Corella Cacatua sanguinea Herdsman Lake Western Australia

Little Corella

Native to Australia but not naturally occurring in Western Australia, the Little Corella (Cacatua sanguinea) is a common resident in the Perth metropolitan area. In fact, abundant food and the absence of predators have allowed the population to explode over the last two decades, and flocks of a few hundred birds are not uncommon. They are opportunistic feeders that eat grass seeds, bulbs and grains in noisy nomadic foraging flocks, causing havoc and damage to trees, paddocks and homes. And while competing for nesting hollows with black cockatoos, parrots, owls and raptors, and interbreeding with endemic species, Little Corellas not only have an impact on our urban environment, but also to our biodiversity. Despite all the trouble they bring about, with their fleshy blue-eyed ring and rose-pink coloured plumage these birds always remain a great subject for photography, especially when you can connect with them at eye-level.

Oblong Turtle Chelodina Oblonga Herdsman Lake Western Australia

Oblong Turtle – Booyi

The Oblong Turtle (Chelodina oblonga) or Booyi is one of 8 species of long-necked turtles represented in Australia, where it can be found in the wetlands and swamps throughout the southwest region. These carnivorous reptiles use echolocation to hunt for fish, molluscs and crustaceans in low visibility water, and when identified prey is near their head strikes forward to snatch it. Although seemingly slow, large female turtles attack ducklings and even swamp hens with astonishing speed! Life for metropolitan turtles is not easy, as many ephemeral swamps have been converted in housing estates and playgrounds, leaving their habitat rather fragmented in a hostile world, and although Oblong turtles still migrate, for many their journey ends when crossing busy roads. In spring females can be spotted out of the water in search for a safe spot to lay their eggs: they can produce up to 3 clutches of 2-16 eggs that take between 26-41 weeks to hatch. Although many hatchlings are born at the end of winter, many will never find their way back to the water as …

Ornate Dragon Ctenophorus ornatus Boyagin Nature Reserve Western Australia

Ornate Dragon

Over the past few weeks I have not only been looking for Western Brush Wallaby (Macropus irma), as mentioned in my previous post, but also for the Banded Anteater or Numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus). This carnivorous marsupial has featured on my bucket list for quite a while now, and several trips have been made to Boyagin Nature Reserve to find it. Located in the Wandoo woodlands of Western Australia’s wheatbelt, Boyagin is one of the few places where Numbats can be found, as a once thriving population has been dramatically reduced due to land clearing and predation by feral cats and foxes. The translocated Boyagin population has been estimated at 50-100 animals, but as their home range is around 50 hectares, chances of casual sightings are not that high. Although my patience and luck are still tested as far as Numbats go, Boyagin is a beautiful reserve to explore with plenty of other interesting animals and plants to discover. The huge undisturbed granite outcrop that lends its name to the reserve is a prime habitat for the Ornate Dragon …