Australian Birds, Australian Wildlife, Wildlife
Comments 3

Little Corella

Little Corella Cacatua sanguinea Herdsman Lake Western Australia

Native to Australia but not naturally occurring in Western Australia, the Little Corella (Cacatua sanguinea) is a common resident in the Perth metropolitan area. In fact, abundant food and the absence of predators have allowed the population to explode over the last two decades, and flocks of a few hundred birds are not uncommon. They are opportunistic feeders that eat grass seeds, bulbs and grains in noisy nomadic foraging flocks, causing havoc and damage to trees, paddocks and homes. And while competing for nesting hollows with black cockatoos, parrots, owls and raptors, and interbreeding with endemic species, Little Corellas not only have an impact on our urban environment, but also to our biodiversity. Despite all the trouble they bring about, with their fleshy blue-eyed ring and rose-pink coloured plumage these birds always remain a great subject for photography, especially when you can connect with them at eye-level.

Little Corella Cacatua Sanguinea Herdsman Lake Western Australia

3 Comments

  1. Always difficult to comprehend that something so beautiful could be so damaging at the same time. We have a similar issue with the common myna, native to India, that’s been steadily spreading all over the country and wreaking havoc with indigenous birds.

    • Absolutely Dries, same problem with Asian Mynas in Australia too, particularly in the eastern states – although they’re widely disliked as an introduced species they’re not as aggressive as wattlebirds, magpies and miners, who represent the pinnacle of Australian aggression

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